Find a Floor Store in Your Area

Refine Your Search Results

Tile and LEED

The U.S.
Green Building Council (USBDC) LEED Logo

By using eco–friendly recycled content ceramic tiles and recycled glass tile flooring and eco–friendly supporting installation materials, you can work towards receiving LEED points. These LEED points can then qualify your home or building for certain levels of LEED certification. In this section we will cover what the LEED rating and certification program is and how you can use ceramic tile floors and glass tile flooring to contribute toward building a LEED certified home or building.

LEED Certification and Green Ceramic Tile or Glass Tile Floors

LEED Certiifed, LEED Silver, LEED Gold and LEED Platinum are the
four main LEED Certifications that can be earned for your building

LEED stands for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design. The LEED rating and certification program was developed by the U. S. Green Building Council (USGBC) as an internationally recognized system of green building certification. By awarding points in specific categories including materials and resources, indoor environmental quality, energy and atmosphere, sustainable sites, water efficiency, and innovation, the LEED rating and certification provides guidelines needed to build green homes and buildings, as well as the certification to prove that one has done so. By using eco–friendly tile flooring such as recycled content ceramic tiles and recycled glass tiles you can work towards earning LEED certification for your home or building. We will discuss this more in detail in the next section.

LEED certified homes and business can be certified on 4 different levels – Certified, Silver, Gold, and Platinum, with LEED Platinum Certification being the highest honor. LEED certified homes are highly sought after and have increased asset values due to the current demand for eco–friendly homes and buildings. Constructing eco–friendly homes and buildings not only benefits the investors, but also the inhabitants, as they can expect a healthy indoor air quality, creating a safer place to work or live.

There are several different types of projects in which you can receive points for LEED certified homes and buildings. Because green ceramic tile and glass tile floors are commonly used in LEED certified commercial interiors and in LEED homes, we will provide some examples of LEED credits that can be earned using recycled glass tiles and ceramic tiles, as well as other tile flooring related products in the following section.

LEED for Commercial Interiors (LEED – CI) and Tile Floors

LEED Materials and Resources Credits MR 4.1 and 4.2

By using eco–friendly flooring such as recycled content ceramic tile or recycled glass tiles for your floor covering this contributes toward receiving the LEED Materials and Resources Credits 4.1 and 4.2. MR 4.1 requires 10% of the cost of the total building materials used in the commercial interior to be made with post–consumer recycled content*. MR 4.2 is similar but instead requires 20% of building materials to be made with post–consumer recycled content*.

*Pre–consumer, also known as post–industrial content can also be used but is counted at half its actual quantity.

LEED Materials and Resources Credits MR 5.1 and 5.2

Glass and ceramic tile floors that have been manufactured locally can contribute towards receiving the LEED Materials and Resources 5.1 credit when 20% of the building materials where manufactured within 500 miles of the site of installation. Additionally, if the resources needed to manufacture the ceramic tiles or glass tiles are acquired within this same distance and MR 5.1 has already been achieved, tiles can contribute toward the LEED Materials and Resources MR 5.2 credit. This credit requires a total of 10% of all building materials in the project to have been recovered, extracted, or harvested within 500 miles of the site of installation.

LEED Indoor Environmental Quality Credits IEQ 4.1 and 4.3

By using low VOC emitting adhesives and sealants with your tile installation, you can work towards earning LEED IEQ 4.1 credit. Additionally, the IEQ 4.3 credit can be obtained by using not only SCS FloorScore certified tiles, but also by using qualifying low VOC tile grout and setting adhesives, resulting in an eco–friendly floor system.

Note: When it is stated that a certain percentage of building materials must be used to earn a specific LEED credit, this is based on the total cost of the materials used in the entire project.

LEED for Homes (LEED – H) and Tile Floors

LEED Materials and Resources Credits MR 2.2

To receive the LEED for Homes Material and Resources MR 2.2 credit, you must use environmentally preferable products. This includes recycled ceramic tile and recycled glass tiles with at least 25% post–consumer recycled content (pre–consumer content can also be used but is counted at half its actual quantity) and SCS FloorScore certified tiles. This category also applies to tile adhesives, sealers, and other installation products that meet low VOC level requirements. In addition, points can be earned in this category for using eco–friendly tiles and other building materials whose resources where acquired and manufactured within a 500 mile radius of the building site.

LEED Innovative Design Credits ID 2

By using water resistant flooring, such as some ceramic tile and glass tile floors, you can contribute towards earning the LEED Innovation and Design ID 2 credits which focuses on durability management. To receive this credit, one must take several indoor moisture control measures which include using water–resistant flooring in kitchens, bathrooms, laundry rooms, spa areas, and entryways.

MORE INFORMATION ON USING GREEN TILES FOR YOUR LEED CERTIFIED PROJECT

To summarize, ceramic and tile floors cannot be "LEED certified" as specific products like these are not certified by the LEED rating system. Recycled content tile can, however, help you work towards building a healthy, profitable, LEED certified green home or building. To learn more about recycled ceramic tile and glass tile flooring, visit FindAnyFloor's section on the Tile Flooring Lifecycle. For more on LEED certification and tile flooring, visit the USGBC.org.


>